Tzedakah

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The members of Temple Beth Israel believe very strongly in Tzedakah, which roughly translated means “Charity.” It is our obligation throughout our life to take care of others, especially of widows and orphans as G-d dictates. In our congregation, we encourage every member to go beyond the call of membership and participate in Tzedakah by giving to those in need, not only monetarily, but also with our time, volunteering whenever possible because giving to those in need is one of the signs of a righteous person.

According to Chabad.org

Tzedakah—often translated as charity—is a mainstay of Jewish life. The sages teach that the world was built upon kindness. However, tzedakah goes one step beyond. Literally translated as “justice” or “righteousness,” tzedakah tells us that sharing what we have with others isn’t something special. It’s the honest and just thing to do.
Tzedakah is not limited to gifts of money. Sharing time, expertise, or even a kind smile are all forms of charity that we can do.
No matter how much you were blessed with, you can always share with others. Throwing a coin into a charity box every morning (except for Sabbath and Jewish holidays) sets the tone for the rest of the day. So make sure to make it a habit.

On the website Judasim 101 we read and agree that:

Some Jews traditionally give at least ten percent of their income to charity, Jewish youths are continually going from door to door collecting for various worthy causes. A standard mourner’s prayer includes a statement that the mourner will make a donation to charity in memory of the deceased. In many ways, giving to charity is an almost instinctive Jewish response to express thanks to G-d, to ask forgiveness from G-d, or to request a favor from G-d. According to Jewish tradition, the spiritual benefit of giving to the poor is so great that a beggar actually does the giver a favor by giving a person the opportunity to perform Tzedakah.   

Furthermore, it continues with the Obligation of Tzedakah

Giving to the poor is an obligation in Judaism, a duty that cannot be forsaken even by those who are themselves in need. Some sages have said that tzedakah is the highest of all commandments, equal to all of them combined, Tzedakah is one of the three acts that gain us forgiveness from our sins. The High Holiday liturgy repeatedly states that G-d has inscribed a judgment against all who have sinned, but teshuvah (repentance), tefilah (prayer) and tzedakah can alleviate the decree.
According to Jewish law, we are required to give one-tenth of our income to the poor. This is generally interpreted as one-tenth of our net income after payment of taxes. Taxes themselves do not fulfill our obligation to give tzedakah, even though a significant portion of tax revenues in America and many other countries are used to provide for the poor and needy. Those who are dependent on public assistance or living on the edge of subsistence may give less, but must still give to the extent they are able; however, no person should give so much that he would become a public burden.
The obligation to perform tzedakah can be fulfilled by giving money to the poor, to health care institutions, to synagogues or to educational institutions. It can also be fulfilled by supporting your children beyond the age when you are legally required to, or supporting your parents in their old age. The obligation includes giving to both Jews and gentiles; contrary to popular belief.

pushke

This is called a “Pushke”  פושקע